Welcome to Nature Coast Clinical Research (Inverness)


Clinical trials move medicine forward. Sponsors, such as pharmaceutical companies, governments and foundations fund medical research. Patients who participate in clinical research receive many advantages including treatment at no cost, access to expertise and resources such as expensive tests. Research volunteers shape the future and can have fun while helping others and themselves.

 

As a premier clinical research organization, we have conducted more than 2,500 clinical trials over 20 years and have worldwide recognition for providing patients access to cutting edge medical research. If you have a medical issue and want a research solution, or if you are a healthy volunteer, come visit our center and learn more. One of our experts will be happy to evaluate you.


Shape the Future

Clinical research is a process that gives back. Volunteers generate information that improves future health care outcomes for everyone.

Find relief with new treatments

Volunteers join research to seek relief from affliction and to better understand their conditions with support from our caring team.

Programs Offer Resources or Pay

Study participants receive medical tests, services, counseling and treatment at no charge. These measures may be unavailable to the general public!


We do research in many areas


(NASH) Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

Did You Know?
Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis or NASH is a common, often “silent” liver disease. It resembles alcoholic liver disease, but occurs in people who drink little or no alcohol. The major feature in NASH is fat in the liver, along with inflammation and damage. Most people with NASH feel well and are not aware that they have a liver problem. Nevertheless, NASH can be severe and can lead to cirrhosis, in which the liver is permanently damaged and scarred and no longer able to work properly. (NIH)
If you or someone you know has Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis, call us today!
No cost, and no health insurance required to participate.
Ask your doctor or contact our clinic for more information.
(352) 341-2100

Crohn's Disease

Did You Know?
Crohn's disease is a type of chronic inflammatory bowel disease that causes a variety of symptoms including abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting and weight loss. While crohn's is an immune-related disease, it does not appear to be an autoimmune process.

If you or someone you know suffers with Crohn's disease, call us today!
We have multiple research studies enrolling.

No cost, and no health insurance required to participate.
Ask your doctor or contact our clinic for more information.
(352) 341-2100
Or sign up below!





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Watch what they have to say about their research experience!



Postpartum Depression Research Testimonial
Phase 1 Research Joe's Experience
Phase I Research Terry's Experience

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Our Staff

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Linda Gray

If you know Linda Gray, site manager at Nature Coast Clinical Research in Inverness, you won’t be surprised to learn that in addition to being an accomplished nurse and seasoned research professional, she is a fearless home improvement expert. D-I-Y projects like tiling, painting and installing wood floors are all in a day’s work for Linda. 

She is also an outdoor adventurer. After graduating from nursing school she spent two years working for Windjammer Barefoot Cruises on the Polynesia, a 298 ft, 4 masted, barquentine tall ship as the nurse/bartender. She has always loved the beach and spent every summer of her youth at the Jersey Shore. Since moving to Florida in 1992, her summer destination is St. Augustine where she enjoys seafood - in particular her favorite, crab cakes. 

Linda played eighteen years of women’s softball and has also coached gymnastics, soccer and baseball. Most recently she has taken up kick-boxing four nights a week. 

During those rare, quieter moments, you might find her at home sewing or quilting with her two rescue dogs, April and Molly by her side. But, knowing Linda, there just might be a new D-I-Y project with her name on it…….

Mora "Corkey" Lecorchick

I work at the Nature Coast Clinical Research Inverness office as a Research Assistant, but I’m partial to welcoming visitors as the “Secretary of First Impressions”.  

Over the years I have held many part time jobs while raising 6 beautiful children in Maryland Virginia. When my youngest became a senior in high school, I began working in the mortgage business.  After 15 years, I uprooted to sunny Florida.

I am an avid golfer with a 15 handicap, but my heart belongs to dancing.  My husband and I used to dance at least twice a week while living in Maryland. His favorite is the Country Two Step.  It was hard to find a place to dance when we moved to Inverness, so I started a country line dance class at the club where we live and golf.

I doubt it comes as a surprise that my favorite television shows are Dancing with the Stars and So You Think You Can Dance!

Since my husband is not able to dance any more, I have taken up kickboxing and love it.  The place where I go is very patient with me and everyone there. Our instructors are always watching to make sure we have proper technique and don’t injure ourselves. I would highly recommend them.

Lastly, I am very blessed to be part of this company. Just like my kickboxing Sensei, my co-workers are there to make sure I have the resources and knowledge to do my job successfully.

 

Kim Siddell

I have been a part of JCCR, working at the Inverness site since October 1, 2005. I started out as a research assistant and then became a SC. In 2007, following my mother's footsteps, I took my ACRP coordinator exam and became a CCRC. I love my job and am proud to work with such an amazing group of people and one of the best PI's around!

I have two daughters; a soon to be eight year old and a very grown seven month old who keep me very busy!

In my spare time, I enjoy spending time with my family and friends, whether it be going out on the boat or catching a movie. I despise seafood of any kind. I love salty carbs, they are my bitter enemy! When I was younger, I rode horses, mainly quarter horses, they are my favorite animal! I was a barrel racer- Again, thanks to my mom, a pretty good one. My favorite movie is Little Miss Sunshine and my favorite TV shows are the Knick (MUST SEE) and The Walking Dead.

I am currently working towards my nursing degree at the College of Central Florida. I plan to apply in the spring of 2015 and continue my education towards a master in nursing before I die. It's on my bucket list! 

Lastest Blog Post:


What Are Triglycerides?

What Are Triglycerides?

Triglycerides are a type of fat (lipid) found in your blood.  You get them in two ways – from the food you eat and from what your liver makes.  Eating too many calories, especially from high carbohydrate foods, could lead to high triglycerides (hypertriglyceridemia), as could certain medications.  High triglycerides could also be a sign of diabetes or thyroid problems, or be genetic.

Almost 1 in 3 Americans have high triglycerides.  When you have excess triglycerides, they are stored in the fat cells for later use.  When they are needed, your body releases them as fatty acids, which fuel body movement, create heat, and provide energy for the body processes.

A fasting blood test can tell where your triglyceride level falls.  For good health, your triglyceride level should be less than 150 mg/dL.  Borderline high levels are 150-199 mg/dL.  High is 200-499 mg/dL.   Very high is more than 500 mg/dL

Diet and Lifestyle Changes to reduce High Triglycerides
Consume less sugar and refined carbohydrates – limit white breads, white rice, white potatoes, sweetened beverages, sugary cereals, cakes and cookies.  Instead choose whole grain breads, quinoa or wild rice, and fresh fruits and vegetables. Aim for 30 grams of fiber a day.

Choose Healthy fats – use unsaturated fats such as olive and avocado oils.  Eat fish, poultry, less red meat, and enjoy some meatless meals. 

Limit your intake of alcohol – for some people drinking even a little bit can have a big effect on triglycerides. 

One of the best ways to lower triglycerides is with regular exercise.  Aim for an average of 40 minutes of moderate to high intensity exercise on 3 to 4 days a week.  Taking a brisk walk every day works for many people.

When Healthy Lifestyle Changes Are Not Enough
Your doctor may recommend medication to help lower your high triglycerides, such as nicotinic acid (niacin), fibrates, omega-3-fatty acids (fish oil) or statins.  There are also some new medications being developed that may not only lower your triglycerides, but reduce your risk of heart disease overall.  Many of our research sites are participating in these important clinical trials.  We invite you to contact one of our sites near you to see if you could benefit from one of these programs.

Lori Alexander, MSHS, RDN, CCRC, CLS, FNLA
Director, ENCORE Lipid Center of Excellence


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